• Educational Programs
    • Scholarship Winners
    • Other Educational Programs
  • Health Programs
    • HIV/AIDS Programs
    • Nutrition Program
    • Tuberculosis Program
    • Primary Health Care
    • Women’s Health 
  • Funds
    • Dr. Brown Benevolent Fund
  • Constructing Health Facilities
    • Mbingo Cancer Center Building Project
    • Mutengene Trauma Center
    • Ophthalmology Inpatient Eye Ward and Theatre
    • Emergency Medicine Project 
    • Ophthalmology Clinic and Low Vision Program

Educational Programs

Scholarship Winners

Kafoe

Dr. Samuel Kafoe, scholarship recipient

The Dr. Martin Salia Memorial Scholarship – Support Dr. Samuel Kafoe, the First Recipient 

Read more about the first scholarship recipient, Dr. Samuel Kafoe, and how to support him here. So far, $7,000 out of $10,000 in funding needed has been raised for his first year of residency training. 

 

 

The Dr. Martin Salia Memorial Scholarship was created in 2015, to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Salia. Dr. Salia was a tireless, courageous Sierra Leonean surgeon trained in Cameroon at the Banso Baptist Hospital and then returned to work in his home country in 2011. In Sierra Leone, his professional plans included obtaining medical supplies and staff support for his hospital, teaching medical students and residents, obtaining a PhD in anatomy, and starting a new hospital.  The Cameroon Health and Education Fund approved Dr. Kafoe’s application to receive the first Salia scholarship to receive advanced medical residency training at Mbingo Baptist Hospital and thereby better serve in Sierra Leone when he completes his training.

Other Educational Programs

Banso School for the Blind – This school, which has blind and low vision students from 1st through 6th grades, is on the campus of Banso Baptist Hospital.  The school teaches all students Braille, and, when the students transfer to regular school in 6th grade, the  School for the Blind teachers must translate all their study materials and tests into Braille, then translate them back into English after the students complete their work, so that the regular school teachers can read them.  The school emphasizes learning independence, and some of these students have gone on to college or found good jobs.  An estimated 60% of students have low vision, rather than total blindness, and could read, if they had computers with low vision software, such as Zoom Text, and other vision aids.  One donor has already donated (not through CHEF) 4 closed circuit TVs that greatly magnify text and can be adjusted to change text and background colors to enable maximum visibility of hardcopy text.  Another donor has donated an institutional version of Zoom Text that can be loaded onto multiple computers, and 3 of the older students have already learned to use it.  Your donation of money, computers, or other low vision aids can make a lifetime of difference for a blind or low vision student.

Youth Network for Health (YNH)

  • Encourages youth to create or join health clubs and pledge abstinence from sex and substance abuse, with the aim of preventing HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies, and preserving the intimacy of sex as part of marriage. Information on other prevention methods is provided.
  • Carries out surveys on youths on their sexual awareness, attitudes and practices.
  • Offers free HIV tests to youths with permission from their parents, as well as HIV and AIDS education besides other programs to promote healthy behavior.
  • In 2013, the program staff provided education on HIV and related issues to 52,266 youths and was able to test only 2,866 for HIV because of lack of HIV test kits. Of the 2,866 tested, 54 (nearly 2%) were HIV-positive.
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In class presentation to high school girls.

External funding for this program has dried up and more funds are needed for increased education, HIV screening, and testing as well as to pay for salaries and transport for program staff. The fight against HIV and AIDS among youth remains a big challenge to several communities in Cameroon and winning this struggle requires collaborative efforts from both partners within and without.

Open air youth education.

Open air youth education.

Advanced Life Support In Obstetrics (ALSO). 

CBCHS first introduced ALSO into Cameroon in May 2012 and has taught 8 more courses since then, training about 25 nurses, physicians, and midwives per course. As of 31 December 2013, they have trained 130-150 providers and 17 Cameroonian licensed ALSO instructors from CBCHS, governmental, and other faith-based hospitals and health centers. The ALSO course was developed by the American Academy of Family Physicians and is currently taught in about 50 countries. It uses a combination of hands-on workstations with mannequins and Power Point lectures to train health care providers to manage obstetric emergencies promptly and effectively.  CBCHS is the sole licensed ALSO training institution in Cameroon and works in close collaboration with the Cameroon Ministry of Health.  The North West Regional Delegate of the MOH has requested CBCHS to train government doctors and nurses in every health facility with maternity services in the entire North West Region.

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ALSO training, Bamenda, 2013.

The knowledge and skills learned should help to reduce the high maternal mortality rate in Cameroon, 690/100,000, the ninth highest in the world   Mannequins and other teaching tools, as well as medical equipment and supplies are needed to expand training.  CBCHS is working toward becoming a local distributor of emergency ALSO equipment, because it is very difficult for individual hospitals to procure equipment from other countries. Without proper equipment, trainees cannot provide adequate obstetric care in their facilities use the skills they learned in the course.

 

The Christian Internal Medicine Residency Program (CIMS)CIMS pic

The Christian Internal Medicine Residency Program is a 4 year internal medicine residency located at Mbingo Baptist Hospital in NW Cameroon. The goal of the program is to provide high quality post-graduate medical training to African doctors in a medical mission hospital.  When these doctors finish their training, they will serve their own communities at hospitals and clinics and be in leadership roles across the medical landscape of the country.  Most of the African doctors are Cameroonian, but the program recently took their first resident from Sierra Leone.  During their 4 years, they learn how to care for patients both in the hospital and in the clinic through a wide variety of experiences.  While some funding is provided by the hospital and the Cameroonian Baptist Convention Health Board, they are unable to provide all the funds necessary to offer this important and high quality residency program.  It is through donations that many of the most important resources for teaching are purchased, away rotations are funded, or facilities are constructed.  The current away rotation available to the residents takes place at the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, India.  This hospital in India is able to offer training above the level currently in Africa so the residents are then trained to advance medical practice in Africa in the future.  The CIMS residency program is unique in its ability to provide a high level of training in a resource-limited setting while encouraging the physician graduates to stay and serve in their country where they are needed most.

 

 

Health Programs

HIV/AIDS Programs

Partner Notification Services  Partner notification (PN) is widely used in Europe and North America to reduce the spread of infectious diseases; however, it has rarely been used in Africa to reduce HIV transmission. In 2007, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board (CBCHB) began a pilot PN program to reduce HIV incidence. CBCHB has trained 58 health advisers who are now doing HIV PN in Northwest Region (NWR) and Southwest Region (SWR) of Cameroon.  They interview index HIV cases about their sexual partners, inform the partners they are at risk for HIV infection without revealing the identity of the index case, pre-test counsel the partners, offer them rapid HIV testing in a medical facility or their home, educate index cases and contacts on HIV prevention and risk reduction, and refer those partners who test positive for care and to HIV support groups.  The health advisers include HIV educators, laboratory technicians, clinical nurses and pastors. From August 2007 through December 2010, staff provided PN services to 6,642 persons with newly diagnosed HIV infection.  These persons identified 7,200 sex partners, of whom 5,272 (73%) were notified, and 3974 (75%) were counseled and tested at no charge.  Of the tested persons, 1991 (54%) were HIV positive, of whom 1211 (61%) were linked to care and treatment.  A recent article describes the accomplishments of this innovative program (see Publication page on this website).  This program urgently needs funding to continue this clinical/public health intervention that promotes behavior change and antiretroviral treatment to reduce the risk of HIV transmission

PMTCT Program in West and Adamoua regions.  In 2011 CBCHS received a large grant for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that strives to provides services to prevent mother to child HIV transmission to 90% of pregnant women in the Northwest and Southwest Regions of Cameroon.  However neither CDC nor Cameroon government funding is available to support PMTCT services in the West or Adamoua regions, and we may have to cut back on the established PMTCT services if additional donations are not forth coming.

CBCHS HIV and AIDS Care and Treatment (C&T) Program– Although antiretroviral medications are provided by the Cameroon government, which receives these drugs from the Global Fund for AIDS, TB, and Malaria, donations are needed to provide all other aspects of C&T for HIV-infected persons, including laboratory tests, treatment for opportunistic infections, transport to C&T centers, intensive counseling, hospitalization, building additional C&T clinic space, and other aspects of care.   In 2013, over 15,000 patients were receiving C&T for HIV in CBCHS facilities, and it is anticipated that this number will continue to increase as more people accept HIV testing, learn that they are infected, and seek lifesaving treatment.  Over time, the C&T Program will help stop the HIV pandemic by a combination of antiretroviral treatment that makes infected persons far less infective to others and by counseling on behavior change that reduces unsafe sex.  CHEF donations have helped to subsidize the costs of care for many patients.

HIV Support Group Program – CBCHS sponsors about 80 adult HIV support groups and 10 children’s support groups in villages and towns in 6 of Cameroon’s 10 regions to assist persons living with HIV by helping organize medical care for them and their families; educating them on nutrition, safer sex, family planning, and other healthy activities; and providing them with microenterprise loans and vocational training.  CHEF donations have paid for their transport to monthly meetings and to care and treatment services, travel for CBCHS staff to visit each group, regular laboratory testing, antibacterial prophylaxis to prevent opportunistic infections, and other critical services.

Chosen Children Easter Egg Hunt, April, 2013.

Chosen Children Easter Egg Hunt, April, 2013.

Chosen Children Program – In 2010, 3,462 children were enrolled, 962 of whom received assistance, of whom 45 are living with HIV.  Many of the children in this program are orphaned by parents who have died of HIV/AIDS.  These children are integrated into the foster families in such a way as they do not receive special treatment, rather they receive similar education and care as the other children in the families receive.  Fifty (50%) percent of these donations have been used to support children’s school fees.  Almost 30% of these funds have paid the medical fees for children living with HIV/AIDS.  The remaining funds are used to pay for basic needs of the children (food and clothing), the caregiver’s workshop to distribute school fees, and the salaries of field workers and staff.  Over 3,000 children registered for the program, but there is only enough funding to meet the needs of 800 children.  In order to raise awareness about the needs and challenges faced by orphans and vulnerable children, many of whom are also living with HIV/AIDS, a group of these children formed an advocacy team to perform drama, songs, and poetry at community venues in Cameroon. The team has elected leaders to voice their concerns and needs to community leaders. The children and support staff hope these efforts will decrease stigma and discrimination, and raise local funds to support their needs.

Members of the CCP advocacy team sing for other children at a Christmas party.

 

Nutrition Improvement Program –

Sister Doreen provides nutrition assessment for a malnourished child in the Children's Ward at Mbingo Hospital, July 2015.

Sister Doreen provides nutrition assessment for a malnourished child in the Children’s Ward at Mbingo Hospital, July 2015.

To ameliorate the shortage of human resources in nutrition, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services (CBCHS) started the Nutrition Improvement Program (NIP).  Since 2007, NIP has trained and integrated over 30 nutrition counselors into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV programs, infant welfare, antenatal, diabetes, and HIV care and treatment clinics to improve the nutrition status of children and adults who receive care from CBCHS. NIP is unique because it recruits people who have passed Cameroon’s General Certificate Examination in Food and Nutrition and trains them in evidence-based practices for nutrition counseling and assessment with ongoing supervision by nursing and nutrition supervisors. Nutrition counselors participate in a three-month intensive course covering topics such as infant and young child feeding in the context of HIV; HIV testing and counseling; promotion of exclusive breastfeeding; management of breastfeeding difficulties; proper positioning and attachment to the breast; provision of F75/F100 for malnourished children; preparation and demonstration of supplementing pap (common infant cereal in Cameroon) with soybeans and/or peanut butter; and nutritional management of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and gout. After the training, counselors are posted to hospitals for a 3-6 month internship. After the internship, if the counselors adequately demonstrate nutrition education, assessment, and counseling skills, they are posted to a CBCHS institution. Mr. Nkuoh Godlove has served as the Program Supervisor since 2007 and Dr. Kate Reinsma as the Technical Advisor since 2013.

CBCHS Tuberculosis (TB) Program – In addition to caring for huge numbers of new TB cases, the CBCHS TB Program is challenged by having to care for individuals with both TB and HIV, which occurs in about half of all TB patients.  Additionally, there have been several cases of multi-drug resistant TB, which requires intensive treatment with difficult and expensive drug regimens.  CHEF donations have enabled the TB program to improve care for over 1,000 newly diagnosed TB patients each year.

CoMCHA students washing hands with a gong.

CoMCHA students washing hands with a gong.

Life Abundant Primary Health Care Program:  Primary Health Centers (PHCs) begin when villages request CBCHS services, decide on their own priorities for health care, and agree to build their own clinic and to hire and send for training one or more Health Promoters and/or Community Mother-Child Health Aides (CoMCHAs).  By determining their own priorities for health care, choosing staff from among local villagers, and paying for the building and staff, the villages truly own their own PHCs, thus promoting sustainability.  CoMCHAs provide antenatal care and low-risk deliveries in the PHC, refer higher risk pregnant women to higher level health facilities, care for infants, and provide voluntary counseling and testing for HIV and prophylactic antiretroviral medications to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

The majority of LAP PHCs do not have an adequate light source after dark.  With 50% of deliveries occurring during the night, having adequate light impacts the management of the labor and delivery of mothers.  This situation is further compromised because many of the PHC delivery areas also have inadequate lighting during the day.  What is used in most PHCs is a kerosene lantern which provides limited light.  Additionally, the use of kerosene is a known fire hazard and has possible associations with harm to an individual’s health. The quality of labor and delivery care in the PHCs would be improved with adequate lighting provided by a headlamp.

LAP is currently undergoing a headlamp/solar power pack and solar light bulb trial at 6 sites. The goal of the trial is to document that these devices are helpful to the CoMCHA in improving the quality of care to the women and newborns in the PHC. Funding is needed to provide headlamps/power packs and solar light bulbs for the remaining PHCs in LAP, so that once the trial is successfully concluded, the program can begin in the remaining sites.

Other equipment urgently needed at LAP sites include  cord clamps, forceps, scissors and a fetoscope.

Delivery room at Nkot Primary Heath Center.

Delivery room at Nkot Primary Heath Center.

CoMCHA students

CoMCHA students

CBCHS Women’s Health Program (WHP) – This program was begun in 2007 with several CHEF donations to provide a 4-pronged program which was supported: 1) cervical cancer screening and prevention, 2) family planning, 3) breast cancer screening and referral, and 4) syndromic management of reproductive tract infections (RTIs).  As of the end of December 2013, the WHP had  served  over 30,000 women.  Donations are needed for equipment, staffing, screening, treatment, pathology services, GYN consultation, and other aspects of care.  WHP has six stationary clinics in CBCHS hospitals and health centers in four regions (out of ten) in Cameroon, plus a mobile clinic that takes services to villages, so that women can receive screening and care near their homes. WHP performs cervical cancer screening using visual inspection with acetic acid(VIA) and visual inspection with Lugol’s iodine(VILI)enhanced by Digital Cervicography (DC), which uses a digital camera fitted with a magnification lens to project greatly-magnified, real-time images of the acetic-acid-stained or Lugol’s iodine-stained cervix onto a TV monitor visible to both client and provider.  At the same time, the provider takes a permanent photograph of the cervix and then uploads it to a computer, where it is matched by ID number to the client’s history and physical exam. The photos are used for follow up of patients, training of staff, quality improvement, and distance consultation.  VIA and VILI, have been used extensively in India and other developing countries as substitutes for Pap smear, because, in most developing countries, there is inadequate infrastructure to support Pap smear screening, thus rendering Pap smears both unaffordable and inaccessible to most women.  DC detects 85-96% of cervical pre-cancers, whereas Pap smears detect only about 50-70%, but DC has more false positives than Pap smears.  The cervical changes resulting from application of acetic acid correlate fairly closely to microscopic findings seen on biopsy and thus are used to diagnose pre-cancers, cancers, and other abnormalities.  WHP staff treats pre-cancers with cryotherapy (freezing) or loop electrical excision procedure (LEEP) and biopsies lesions that appear potentially cancerous.  They refer women with cervical cancer for surgery or radiation therapy.

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Staff and volunteers next to the WHP mobile health clinic.

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Trainer projects the image of a cervix for a WHP training of medical professionals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The WHP has been actively seeking more funding through grants to upscale family planning (FP) services and integrate them into antenatal, postpartum, and HIV care and has received a small grant from the US Centers for Disease Control to integrate family planning into HIV services. However, this grant will only cover 2 health facilities for 2 years In the past, USAID has donated some family commodities (methods), but the US government no longer provides these commodities, making it very difficult to get enough to stock clinics. Many women come requesting family planning, but must be turned away, because no commodities are available.   Funds are desperately needed to expand staffing and space and to procure commodities to adequately serve these women.

Funds

Dr. Brown Benevolent Fund

Dr. Jim Brown and his wife began this fund 3 years ago at the Mbingo Baptist Hospital in Cameroon to help needy families pay for vital medical care.

This fund does not pay out money directly to those people or families in need. Instead, the social workers at the Mbingo Baptist Hospital carefully determine which patients/families cannot pay for their hospitalization/treatment/surgery. This fund is usually used for young families with children, those who need radiation or chemotherapy and cannot afford it and also those who are recovering after a devastating trauma or illness. The Dr. Brown Benevolent Fund is usually used 1-2 times a week to pay for part of the bill of those who cannot pay.

Dr. Jim Brown is the chief of surgery and the PAACS program director at the Mbingo Baptist Hospital. The Dr. Brown Benevolent Fund obtains its funding from family, friends and other personal support.

CONSTRUCTING HEALTH FACILITIES

Mbingo Cancer Center Building Project

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Mbingo Baptist Hospital is a 300 bed hospital located in the Northwest Region of Cameroon in Central Africa.view-from-veranda-11 It is being developed into a referral, teaching hospital serving patients from throughout Cameroon. In the past five years, the hospital has developed into one of the few advanced centers in Cameroon where patients can effectively be diagnosed and receive treatment for cancer. Current therapy options available at Mbingo include advanced surgical therapy, full time pathology, and basic chemotherapy.

 

At present, close to 2,000 new patients are diagnosed with cancer at Mbingo.  Patients come there from throughout Cameroon for diagnosis and treatment.

mbingo

View of Mbingo Baptist Hospital.

A specialized program has been developed for pediatric cancer patient in conjunction with Stellenbosch University in South Africa which allows children to receive free treatment for the most common childhood cancers. Through this program better diagnosis and treatment is available for children which has resulted in improved survival outcomes. A cervical cancer treatment program has been implemented throughout the hospitals of the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board. Patients diagnosed in this program are able to receive surgical treatment at Mbingo for their disease. This year, a specialized training program in Head and Neck Surgery was begun. Many of the patients treated in this program have a form of cancer. This is the one of the only programs in Cameroon capable of treating these tumors.

 

Plans are now being developed to introduce radiotherapy at Mbingo. This is a vital component needed for the successful treatment of many types of cancer, especially Head and Neck cancer and cervical cancer. It is very difficult for most patients with these problems to have access to radiation therapy and as a result receive sub- optimum care.

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Mbingo staff.

In order to support the rapidly expanding cancer treatment program at Mbingo, plans are being developed to build a new Cancer Center building. This building will house all of the current cancer treatment programs and allow for expansion in the future.  Components of this building include:

 

 

  • Medical oncology including a chemotherapy infusion area and pharmacy
  • Pediatric oncology unit
  • Surgical oncology clinic
  • Head and Neck clinic
  • Radiation oncology clinic
  • Two bunkers to house linear accelerators
  • Administrative offices
  • Research offices

Current estimated cost of this building is $600,000.

 

Mutengene Trauma Center

Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a leading cause of death and disability in sub- Saharan Africa. According to the World Health Organization, road traffic deaths reached 6,136, or 27.6 deaths per 100,000 population, ranking Cameroon 21st in the world (WHO, 2013).

Despite the heavy burden of trauma cases, Cameroon does not have a single specialized trauma center; all emergency trauma cases are looked after at regional hospitals with limited specialized capacity for trauma cases.

The goal of this project is to reduce mortality, disabilities and morbidity resulting from trauma by improving access to emergency care for trauma victims at Baptist Hospital Mutengene, which is strategically located along the busy Douala-Limbe highway in the Southwest region of Cameroon. The establishment of a Post Injury Trauma Care Center will greatly improve on the management of trauma victims in the region via four main objectives:

  1. Improving access to emergency medical care for trauma victims
  2. Providing high-quality, standard trauma care
  3. Reducing disability, morbidity, and mortality from trauma; and
  4. Improving knowledge, documentation, and reporting of trauma cases.

The Baptist Hospital Mutengene is currently a 98 bed non-profit hospital. It has served the de facto referral center for trauma care seeing more than 1,000 trauma cases a year.

The completed facility will provide a center for teaching and research in trauma, allowing both local and foreign trauma or orthopedics residents and faculty to visit, work and teach.

This first phase of the project involves the construction of the ground floor of the 5-story trauma center and equipping the ground floor with 45 beds including a six-bed intensive care unit; reception and triage; an observation, resuscitation, and stabilization ward; an imaging unit with digital x-ray and ultra sound; two operating theatres; and consultation rooms.

The second phase will be to raise the remaining floors to accommodate a permanent ICU, 50 beds, a physiotherapy and pediatric rehabilitation unit; and a research, training, and medical records center. The third phase of the project will be the construction of a five-story staff housing unit on the hospital grounds to provide safe and comfortable accommodations for onsite and visiting surgeons and resident doctors.

Impact of the Post-Injury Trauma Center:

The center will significantly reduce patient waiting time to surgery, increase the volume of patients receiving standard care, provide training as a tertiary referral center for resident doctors and nursing personnel in both government and non- government training programs, and contribute to the overall health delivery system of the country.

To complete the first phase of the project and get the center running, an estimated $450,000 is needed.

The hospital has already pledged $100,000 to start the project. In addition, the hospital will leverage its existing partners to facilitate the donation of equipment.

 Ophthalmology Inpatient Eye Ward and Theatre,  Mutengene Baptist Hospital – In April 2012 Cameroon received new state-of-the-art equipment allowing for anterior and posterior ophthalmic surgery. This new equipment allowed for the first posterior vitrectomy for retinal disease to be performed in the country.  The Cameroon Baptist Convention (CBC) is in the process of constructing a new medical building on the existing Baptist Hospital Mutengene (BHM) grounds that will greatly increase medical care particularly ophthalmology services to the region. Currently BHM houses, among other things, an outpatient eye unit as well as a single operating theatre, which must serve all the surgical services associated with the hospital.  This single operating theatre greatly hampers the number of ophthalmic cases that can be performed.  The new construction will have an entire floor devoted to ophthalmology services; mainly an in-patient ward and surgical theatre.

Historically many organizations have worked to address Cameroon’s health and eye care needs as well as medical infrastructure.  The ophthalmology focus has been on cataracts, river blindness, trachoma, and glaucoma.  Sources state the doctor patient ratio in Cameroon to be 1 to 12,500 or higher. Among U.S. health care professionals, it is estimated that at least 1 retina specialist is needed per 100,000 people.  Currently in Cameroon there are 60 general ophthalmologists (0.3 per 100,000 people) with only 20% of those involved in surgical ophthalmology.  A 2005 article in the Community Eye Health Journal found a total of just 2 ophthalmologists per 1.2 million populations in Cameroon’s South West Province.  The article also stated that “Tertiary eye services (retinal detachment surgery, diabetic retinopathy laser photocoagulation, pediatric surgery, etc.) are not provided by any of the eye units in the South West Province.”

Due to the great success of the growing ophthalmology and retina services made possible by the CBC, BHM, Dr. Emmanuel Tambe and dedicated staff, funds are needed for BHM’s new construction.

Project goals include:

  1. Completing the new in-patient eye unit allowing for increased surgical services to the larger population centers of Douala, Mutengene and Yaoundé,
  2. Procuring diagnostic equipment such as fluorescein angiography, ocular coherence tomography, and ophthalmic ultrasound for patient triage and optimal visual outcome, and
  3. Spearheading improved management of patient records to include electronic medical records allowing for the future possibility of telemedicine outreach.

Emergency Medicine Project at Mbingo Baptist Hospital:

CHEF’s newest initiative, the Emergency Medicine Project, will address a key gap in a region that sees a significant number of trauma cases and patients in shock from sepsis, hemorrhage, and sometimes cardiac or pulmonary organ failure. This project will substantially increase the quality of care of patients requiring emergency medical services at Mbingo, a hospital that serves as a higher-level referral facility for thousands of people in the surrounding region of Northwest Cameroon.

Currently, when patients arrive in critical condition, they are seen by a screener or nurse practitioner, but sometimes the call team is notified too late and patients are lost unnecessarily.

The Emergency Medicine Project will consist of several components to create an effective system of triage, resuscitation and admission to the appropriate services.  These interventions will include:

  • Remodeling the current outpatient building to create three treatment bays.
  • Updating patient consultation rooms, tiling the floors, and installing wall oxygen and suction.
  • Purchasing equipment for the emergency medicine department including defibrillators, IV pumps, monitors, etc.
  • Training of personnel in emergency life-saving care using formal training courses developed and used in the United States including: advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), basic cardiac life support (BCLS), pediatric advanced life support (PALS), and others.
  • Instituting a system to designate a physician to call at all times to review the patient and decide the course of care.

CHEF has already received a $10,000 donation from Zachery and Wendy Shinar to support this project. A total of approximately $6,000 more is needed to make this project a reality.

Ophthalmology Clinic and Low Vision Program, Banso Baptist Hospital – 

For the last several years the CHEF Fund has supported the ongoing Ophthalmology Clinic construction at the Banso Baptist Hospital at Kumbo. The ground floor of the clinic has been in use for the last several years but the upper floors were not yet built. In 2014 there were sufficient funds to start the construction of those upper floors. Money for the roof did not become available until 2015. The photos are from July 2014 showing the skeleton of the complete building with no roof.  In August 2015 the new roof is shown in place making the building dry during the rainy season. The completion of those two upper floors remains to be done, the first floor is planned to be the inpatient ward for the postoperative eye patients. The top floor is intended to be a new ward for private patients.

Banso pic 2

 

Banso pic 1